All Aboard: A Streetcar To The Past

This streetcar was manufactured in New York for the Columbus Consolidated Streetcar Railroad in Columbus, Ohio. That was in 1888. It was converted to electric power a few years later before it was sold to the Lancaster Traction Company in 1896.

It remained in service until 1937 when the city switched to a bus system. Thousands of people came to a celebration to take one last ride.

Today the streetcar is on display at Ohio History Connect, our state’s historical society.

You can go aboard and even have a seat if you like. This was my second favorite thing to see at this museum. My favorite is a temporary exhibit about the fifties in America. Read about it here.

Remembering Dr. King and the National Civil Rights Museum

Today we celebrate the life, teachings and sacrifice of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. If he had not been cut down by an assassin’s bullet in 1968, he would be 91 now. He would have elderly children, grandkids and great grandkids. It’s hard to picture when you consider the timeless images of a young man like the one above.

Here he is with his wife and first child. It brings to mind the famous quote that we all have heard.

“I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

You have to wonder how much different the world and our country might be had he lived longer.

Today I thought we should visit the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, TN. First of all, Memphis is one of my favorite places because there is music and history and culture and mac and cheese at every turn. Seriously, the abundance of homemade mac and cheese is pretty spectacular.

But it’s also home to this museum that beautifully and skillfully tells the story behind the movement.

Among other things, the museum has preserved the Loraine Motel where Dr. King was murdered. You can see his room and the balcony where he stood when bullets were fired from a boarding house across the street. Incidentally, you can tour that boarding house as well.

Visiting here was a sobering, humbling experience that sort of put a damper on the fun of all that music and food. But friends, I would go back today if given the opportunity and I would highly recommend it to you as well.

Facing history gives us the opportunity to learn from our past, to humanize those people we read about in text books and to hopefully do better tomorrow. And if nothing else, a place like this instills in us a new sense of empathy and understanding that we may not have known on our own.

Want to visit the National Civil Rights Museum? Click here for details. If you wish to ponder the teachings and thoughts of Dr. King, this is a good source for quotes.

I’d Love To Be An Oscar Mayer Weiner

Want to get a song stuck in your head? I’ll just leave this right here.

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Oh, I’d love to be an Oscar Mayer wiener.
That is what I’d truly like to be.
‘Cause if I were an Oscar Mayer wiener,
Everyone would be in love with me.

Oh, I’m glad I’m not an Oscar Mayer wiener.
That is what I’d never want to be.
Cause if I were an Oscar Mayer wiener.
There would soon be nothing left of me!

And in case you ever wish to visit the Oscar Meyer Weiner Mobile, you can do so at the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village in Dearborn, Michigan. Last year I wrote about the Rosa Parks Bus which is on display there. I also wrote about their Mold-A-Rama machines and they happen to have a machine where you can get a Weiner Mobile made.