The Chair

This chair was for sale in an antique store near Kenton, Ohio. It’s actually in a cute little town called Mt. Victory that boasts several antique stores.

I didn’t look at the price because it wouldn’t fit in the car but can’t get out of my head that I need a chair like this. Wouldn’t it make a great reading chair? Is it bad that I’m still drooling over this chair almost a month later? I’m in vacation saving mode now so there will be no chair acquisition in my immediate future but it’s nice to dream.

That exposed brick wall is awfully nice too.

It’s so important to have a great place to relax in your home. What’s your favorite room like? Tell me in the comments! I’m always looking for ideas to cozy up my home!

If you’re in the Mt. Victory area, it would be worth a stop to check out their antique stores! The drive-in theater with the great sign is nearby too!

There Was A Time

There was a time you could pick up a cool old coffee can for under $10. I have a few in my collection of random stuff – two hold flowers on the back porch and there are two or three in my kitchen too. All are missing the lids so they came for the bargain basement price of about five bucks.

I’ve seen many coffee cans lately but they’re going for upwards $20 and sometimes $30-$40 regardless of condition. These were over $50.

The market drives the prices but it’s shocking how quickly the tide turns and the prices rise.

Another item that has become almost too expensive to collect is records. In one of these bins, I found a Nat King Cole album that I purchase a couple of years ago for $2. Here it was $18.

The average album price in this antique mall was about $13 but many reissues of albums go for about $16. Since all the cool kids are going vintage I’m guessing prices will only continue to increase.

What do you collect that has seen a rise in prices?

A Change Of Plans

Today’s post was supposed to be about a light display in a neighboring town. The plan was to go last night and grab a vegan burger from a mom and pop place in the neighborhood.

But the sun was shining yesterday and it was beautiful. Consequently, I made the game time decision to spend the morning hiking and stay home last night. Sometimes you just have to go with the flow!

That’s actually one benefit of being single – a gal can change her mind without considering anyone else’s feelings anytime she likes.

It’s dark when I leave work so hiking isn’t typically an option this time of year. It seemed smart to take advantage of the sunshine.

It was 30 degrees when I went into the woods and about 15 degrees warmer on exit. There weren’t many people out – mainly the hearty souls like me who really wanted to be in nature.

So it was a great day for a stretch of the legs and just what I needed to help clear my mind. In fact, I went in feeling a bit uptight but came out feeling great.

A quick trip through the antique mall yielded a new book. Afterward, a sandwich from a local deli resulted in an impromptu picnic. Hey! The sun was shining and it was above freezing! It was a perfect day for it!

It turned out to be a great day.

Nature was calling. I had to go. I’ve seen those Christmas lights before and they will be there later.

My Guide To Surviving Winter

It’s still fall but we are flirting with winter weather here in southern Ohio. Please don’t stop reading when I say this but winter makes my heart happy.

Here’s why.

Winter feels like Nature’s way of telling me to slow down, to rest and to appreciate the small joys of my home. I’ve been unwittingly practicing the Norwegian art of Hygge for years!

For the other three seasons, if the weather is tolerable I feel compelled to be active from dawn to dusk. Whether it be on a hike or an adventure or just an errand, it feels like time spent at home could be better used.

Since the time change, I’ve begun to nest here in my house on the ridge. It started as decluttering, finally taking cardboard and plastic to recycling and then taking quick glances around each room for unneeded things.

The next thing I knew, each kitchen cabinet was being emptied and boxes and bags filled up to give away. Coats for a drive at work, tops my mother might like, dvds and a big meat cleaver for my dad (it seemed a bit much for the vegetable eater here)

Now attention has turned to making things cozy. First I dropped new wax melts into all my scent burners. Winter means a mix of cinnamon, citrus and pine. Then I began putting out heavier throws for winter couch cuddling and the flannel sheets were washed and put on the bed.

Winter means more movies on the couch and books in bed so I’ve begun a new stack of books I really want to read this winter. I also pulled out some new jigsaw puzzles. There’s nothing better than sitting by the window on a snowy day to work on a puzzle. Although Scout likely won’t allow this to happen this year. Kittens have other uses for small items like puzzle pieces.

There will still be adventures on weekends when weather permits. There’s nothing better than a fast hike in the cold unless it’s a slow hike in the snow where you can look for animal tracks and enjoy the shimmering beauty of a world blanketed in snow.

There will be more time spent in local antique malls. Winter is when I allow myself to shop for records so I’ll rush home to clean and listen to my treasures. Maybe this is the year I’ll find that mid century console record player I’ve been looking for. It has to work and has to have great mid century lines. I’ll find the one someday.

This winter I’m planning a jaunt to Cincinnati to the Freedom Center and maybe another to Dayton for the Packard Museum. There are some terrific antique malls in both cities as well as other museums to make me wonder if I shouldn’t make these overnights rather than a quick out and back. I will appreciate these adventures more because they will be less common and will prevent cabin fever from setting in.

While there will still be adventures this winter, the focus will be at home. I want to find a vegan hot chocolate recipe and work on some soups. I want to curl up with my cat to watch a movie or catch up on my magazine reading. I want to take hot baths and listen to good music.

For me, winter is about being cozy and making things beautiful. Since I live in the country, it’s also about making do and being happy with what you have, an exercise in gratitude if I’ve ever heard of one.

I am grateful for this period of rest and quiet. It’s what I need to recharge from months of busyness and to prepare me for months more of adventure and exploration.

So while everyone is miserable because of the cold, snow and dark, I will be as happy as if it were 75 degrees and sunny. And I think that’s petty cool.

The National Road-Zane Grey Museum

If you’ve been reading here for a while you most likely have noticed my mild obsession with the National Road.  For many people, it’s just a line on a map but I think there’s a sense of romance found along this road. Some might call it roadside kitsch but a drive along some sections is like a journey back in time to days before fast food and hotels could be found along interstate exits.

It’s a fun search for remnants of a bygone era when enterprising farmers and businessmen alike worked to accommodate the cross country traveler. You’ll see old diner signs, faded murals on brick buildings, abandoned motels and the occasional neon sign as well as farms, quaint small towns and modern amenities to make your adventure fun.

I adore the towns where you find mom and pop establishments like the Oasis Diner in Plainfield, Indiana or the fabulous Lynn’s Pharmacy and Soda Fountain just a few miles down the road. There are a host of antique stores and cute shops along this route as well as friendly people, eager to know where you’re from and to hear about your rambling trip through their neck of the woods. 

It’s fun. It’s slow travel as the road cuts through small cities and villages, forcing you to reduce your speed and enjoy the journey. In fact, when I travel the National Road, I like to think that the journey is the destination. 

In case you don’t know, the National Road was the first major highway built by the federal government. Construction began in Cumberland, Maryland in 1811 and today it ends in St. Louis. In it’s early days, it was a thoroughfare for conestoga wagons and people on horseback while it was later used for bicycles and then automobiles.

The origins of the National Road are skillfully told at the National Road-Zane Grey Museum near Zanesville. The museum also covers the local ceramics industry and the life of prolific writer Zane Grey. For today, we’ll just talk about the National Road portion of the museum and we’ll discuss the other topics another day.

I brought my parents here on a little birthday adventure last week and was thrilled to learn the museum lived up to its reputation.

There are several things to see here but the most notable may be well over one hundred feet of display case featuring vignettes that depict the road over time. Professionally done and meticulously created works of art, these scenes feature houses, businesses, people, animals, trains, boats, bicycles and necessary scenery to depict the creation and evolution of the road. From the cutting of virgin forests through the advent of the automobile, you’ll find everything in between.

But there are a host of other things – lifelike mannequins look like they could speak to you as they depict work in a blacksmith’s shop as well as a tavern scene that portrays how needed services became available as the road gained in popularity.

There are some fabulous old cars and bicycles as well as a conestoga wagon that was once used for transporting cargo. This piece in particular is fascinating. It exists because someone had tucked it away in a barn to use for storing hay. It remained sheltered this way for many decades before coming into the possession of the Ohio Historical Society and later finding a home here in this museum.

If you look closely, some of the original nineteenth century paint remains – red on the wheel spokes and a sort of slate gray on the body of the wagon.

It’s incredible to realize that this piece, which should have been lost to weather and time, is in such fine condition and accessible to museum visitors in the year 2019.

The museum is operated by Ohio History Connection (the rebranded name of the Ohio Historical Society). One of the museum’s ambassadors is a gent named Jerry who seems to know his history on all three topics – the National Road, Zane Grey and ceramics – both forward and backward. He has an engaging way of telling a story and a fantastic sense of humor, helping guests feel like they’re just here for a visit with an old friend rather than for an educational experience.

My mother will tell you that she doesn’t like history but even she had fun and learned a lot here.

This was a great experience and well worth the few dollars they ask for admission. Interested?  Click here to get hours, admission and other details!

Jerry also recommended a stop at Tom’s Ice Cream Bowl but we (sadly) had to skip it as we were running low on time and ate too much lunch anyway. So I’ll go back another day and check out the ice cream – or you can go on my behalf and let me know how silly we were to not stop!

G.C. Murphy

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It’s an antique mall now but they kept the GC Murphy letters on the storefront. This store is in Gallipolis, across from the city park in downtown, and I always try to stop by when in town. GC Murphy was a staple of my childhood and sometimes I really miss stores like this and Woolworth’s.

The antique mall is nice although they also have a number of craft items too. These things undoubtedly appeal to many, if not to me. Stop in the next time you’re in Gallipolis and remember there are other stores in Gallipolis and nearby Point Pleasant, West Virginia!