Planes, Trains and Automobiles!

Everyone recognizes Henry Ford as an industrialist and pioneer in mass production who changed the way Americans travel.

In case you don’t know, his philosophies about production efficiencies extended to many areas of his business and are still used today. He also understood that a happy employee is a more productive employee and one less likely to leave. So Ford introduced the unheard of $5 a day wage, providing his employees a comfortable living and making it possible for them to afford to buy the cars they were building. It was a smart move because reducing turnover, cuts costs and improves efficiency.

What many people don’t know is this that Ford also was fascinated by science, technology and Americana. So in the twenties, he began collecting things for what would eventually become the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village.

He plucked up important structures and items with historic value from around the country and began bringing them to Dearborn, Michigan.

This place has grown and is modernized for the 21st century visitor but remains true to Henry Ford’s vision.

I had been before but was feeling a real draw to go back for some reason. I spent most of a full day wandering around the museum, taking pictures, reading signs and admiring the collection so vast that it’s hard to see everything with one pass.

Anyone who knows me well won’t be surprised that I spent the vast majority of my day lingering over the cars and planes. If it has an open cockpit or tail fins, I’m probably going to be a fan.

Here are a few pictures for your viewing enjoyment.

Any vehicle with interesting lines and a cool color is A-ok in my book!

Did you know that Ford made an airplane? They also have one at the Model T Museum in Richmond, Indiana.

It’s a train snow plow! How cool is this?

This little car was made by Crosley, the same people who gave us the Crosley Radio. We’ll talk a little more about them another day. And yes, it’s as tiny as it looks!

Combining my excitement for aviation and interest in reporting!

Check back. I have a couple of specific stories to tell you and we’ll go to some other areas of the museum!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s